Mango Fruit Leather

Mango Fruit LeatherMango fruit leather has turned out to be one of my kids’ favorites. The sugar is totally optional, but it makes it much sweeter and cuts the tartness.   

Fruit Leather can be made from nearly any ripe fruit, peaches, apples, pears, and mangoes are good choices. It is a delicious way to preserve your harvest.

Ingredients for Mango Fruit Leather

2 pounds of fully ripe mangoes (about 3)

Juice of 1 lemon

3 tablespoons of sugar (or more to taste)

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Instructions for Mango Fruit Leather

Wash and coarsely chop your fruit. Here is the simplest way I have found to cut up a mango. 

Cut Core from MangoHold your mango on your cutting board with the stem facing down, narrow side facing up. You will see a line going all the wayaround the center of the mango. Cut about 1/4″ from the widest center line on each side of the pit. You will have two ovals of mango flesh and a center that is mostly mango pit, with a little flesh left.
 
Cut Inside MangoCut cubes into the oval mango flesh in a checkerboard pattern, similar to an avocado. Be careful not to cut through the skin. I place it on a cutting board, just in case the knife goes through, so I don’t cut my hand. 
 
Cut MangoTurn the cut mango ovals inside out by using your thumbs to push the skin up from the bottom and pull the mango chunks off of the skin with a spoon. Peel the skin off the pit slice and cut or scrape the rest of the flesh from the pit.
 
Mango in Food ProcessorPlace mango chunks in a food processor or food mill.  Add lemon juice and sugar.
 
Pureed MangoPuree until smooth and sugar is dissolved.

Mango Puree on Dehydrator TrayLine a baking sheet with parchment paper or use a sheet lined dehydrator tray. Pour the puree mixture onto the baking sheet or dehydrator tray in ¼ cup portions. Spread puree to 1/4 inch thick.

Place baking sheet in an oven or place in dehydrator at 135 degrees for 7-10 hours or until dry, but still pliable. (Times vary depending on the type of fruit and sugar content).

Mango Fruit Leather Ready to StoreAllow your mango fruit leather to cool, peel off the parchment paper or dehydrator liner. Place waxed paper between each piece and store in an airtight container.

Tip: If your fruit leather is brittle, try adding more sugar next time you make it.

Thank you for visiting Mama’s Homestead!

~Nelle

Mango Fruit Leather
Mango fruit leather has turned out to be one of my kids’ favorites. The sugar is totally optional, but it makes it much sweeter and cuts the tartness.
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Ingredients
  1. 2 pounds of fully ripe mangoes (about 3)
  2. Juice of 1 lemon
  3. 3 tablespoons of sugar (or more to taste)
Instructions
  1. Wash and coarsely chop your fruit. Puree prepared fruit in a food processor or run through a food mill. Add lemon juice and sugar; stir until sugar is dissolved.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or use a sheet lined dehydrator tray. Pour the puree mixture onto the baking sheet or dehydrator tray in ¼ cup portions. Spread puree to 1/4 inch thick.
  3. Place baking sheet in an oven at 135 degrees for 7-10 hours or until dry, but still pliable. (Times vary depending on the type of fruit and sugar content).
  4. Allow the fruit leather to cool, peel off the parchment paper or dehydrator liner. Place waxed paper between each piece and store in an airtight container.
Notes
  1. Tip: If your fruit leather is brittle, try adding more sugar next time you make it.
Mama’s Homestead http://www.mamashomestead.com/
About Nelle

I am Nelle. I grew up in rural, small town, Ohio. When I was young, I learned a lot about homesteading from my parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, 4-H, FFA, and others around me.
Now, I’m all grown up, have 6 children of my own, and plan to teach them everything I know.

Here on Mama’s Homestead, we talk and write about homesteading, homeschooling, and kidsteading (homesteading with kids). We teach our kids about survival, self-sufficiency, gardening (vegetable, herb, flower), orchard, beekeeping, home keeping, soap making, harvesting, cooking, food preservation, livestock, nature, crafts, homesteading tools and wares, and more…

Welcome to my homestead…come and learn with us!

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