Grape Soda Jelly

Grape Soda JellyUp next, Grape Soda Jelly. I think this would probably be my sister’s favorite soda. She loves all things purple or grape flavored. This soda jelly, surprisingly tastes a lot like regular grape jelly you would buy at the grocery store.

Ingredients for Grape Soda Jelly

4 cups of grape soda

1 package (1.75 ounces) fruit pectin or 8 tablespoons of bulk pectin

4 cups of pure cane sugar

Tools needed to make Grape Soda Jelly

 Jelly jars and two-piece lids

Candy Thermometer

Ladle

Magnetic jar lifter

Jar Funnel

Clean, damp cloth

Kitchen tongs

Water-Bath Canner

Jar Lifter

Cooling rack or dry towel

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Instructions for Grape Soda Jelly

Prepare your jars and lids for canning and keep your jars hot until ready to use. If you are new to canning read Getting Ready to Can.

Grape Soda ready to boilPour grape soda into a medium sauce pan. Add pectin, stir until dissolved. Bring to a boil that does not stop when stirred.

Grape Soda Jelly heating upAdd sugar and stir until dissolved. Bring mixture to a full boil and allow to cook until a temperature of 220 degrees F (on a candy thermometer), stirring constantly. Turn off heat. Skim off foam, if necessary (If you like, you can microwave the foam for 30 seconds to return it to a jelly like substance.). Grape soda may fizz a lot when trying to make it into jelly. I left the foam, it adds to the authenticity. Refrigerate your soda jelly and enjoy or can it to enjoy the rest of the year.

Tip: No candy thermometer? Test for gelling by dipping a metal tablespoon in a glass of ice water, then scoop up half spoonful of the mix and let it cool to room temperature on the spoon. If it thickens and clings to the spoon, the jelly is ready. If not, allow to boil a little longer and test again, until desired consistency is achieved.

Canning Grape Soda Jelly

Grape Soda JellyLadle hot grape soda jelly into prepared jars, allowing ¼ inch head space. Wipe rim and threads of jars with a clean, damp cloth.

Place your lids onto your jars, making sure the rubber seal meets the jar rim. Screw on the metal band firmly (fingertip tight). Note: Screwing them on too tight may cause them to not seal or to buckle.

Use a jar lifter to place your jelly in a boiling water bath. Place the lid on the canner.  Bring water to a boil.  Process your grape soda jelly in the boiling water bath for 10 minutes (1,000 feet above sea level). Note: Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches; add boiling water, if necessary.

After processing, turn off heat and remove canner lid. Allow canner to cool 5 minutes.  Remove jars from canner; place upright, 1 to 2 inches apart on wire cooling rack or dry towel.  Allow to cool 12 to 24 hours.  Note: Do NOT try to tighten bands that have loosened during processing.

After 12 to 24 hours has passed, test seals by pressing the center of the lid to determine if it is concave; then remove the band and gently try lifting the lid off with your fingertips.   If the center does not flex up and down and you cannot lift the lid with your fingertips, the lid has a good seal.

If the lid does not have a good seal, refrigerate your grape jelly and use right away or reprocess using a new lid. Also, be sure to check the rim of your jar for nicks.

Thank you for visiting Mama’s Homestead!

~Nelle

 

Grape Soda Jelly
Up next, Grape Soda Jelly. I think this would probably be my sister’s favorite soda. She loves all things purple or grape flavored.
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Ingredients
  1. 4 cups of grape soda
  2. 1 package (1.75 ounces) fruit pectin or 8 tablespoons of bulk pectin
  3. 4 cups of pure cane sugar
Instructions
  1. Prepare your jars and lids for canning and keep your jars hot until ready to use. If you are new to canning read Getting Ready to Can.
  2. Pour grape soda into a medium sauce pan. Add pectin, stir until dissolved. Bring to a boil that does not stop when stirred.
  3. Add sugar and stir until dissolved. Bring mixture to a full boil and allow to cook until a temperature of 220 degrees F (on a candy thermometer), stirring constantly. Turn off heat. Skim off foam, if necessary (If you like, you can microwave the foam for 30 seconds to return it to a jelly like substance.). Grape soda may fizz a lot when trying to make it into jelly. I left the foam, it adds to the authenticity. Refrigerate your soda jelly and enjoy or can it to enjoy the rest of the year.
  4. Tip: No candy thermometer? Test for gelling by dipping a metal tablespoon in a glass of ice water, then scoop up half spoonful of the mix and let it cool to room temperature on the spoon. If it thickens and clings to the spoon, the jelly is ready. If not, allow to boil a little longer and test again, until desired consistency is achieved.
  5. Canning Grape Soda Jelly
  6. Ladle hot grape soda jelly into prepared jars, allowing ¼ inch head space. Wipe rim and threads of jars with a clean, damp cloth.
  7. Place your lids onto your jars, making sure the rubber seal meets the jar rim. Screw on the metal band firmly (fingertip tight). Note: Screwing them on too tight may cause them to not seal or to buckle.
  8. Use a jar lifter to place your jelly in a boiling water bath. Place the lid on the canner. Bring water to a boil. Process your grape soda jelly in the boiling water bath for 10 minutes (1,000 feet above sea level). Note: Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches; add boiling water, if necessary.
  9. After processing, turn off heat and remove canner lid. Allow canner to cool 5 minutes. Remove jars from canner; place upright, 1 to 2 inches apart on wire cooling rack or dry towel. Allow to cool 12 to 24 hours. Note: Do NOT try to tighten bands that have loosened during processing.
  10. After 12 to 24 hours has passed, test seals by pressing the center of the lid to determine if it is concave; then remove the band and gently try lifting the lid off with your fingertips. If the center does not flex up and down and you cannot lift the lid with your fingertips, the lid has a good seal.
  11. If the lid does not have a good seal, refrigerate your grape jelly and use right away or reprocess using a new lid. Also, be sure to check the rim of your jar for nicks.
Mama’s Homestead http://www.mamashomestead.com/
About Nelle

I am Nelle. I grew up in rural, small town, Ohio. When I was young, I learned a lot about homesteading from my parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, 4-H, FFA, and others around me.
Now, I’m all grown up, have 6 children of my own, and plan to teach them everything I know.

Here on Mama’s Homestead, we talk and write about homesteading, homeschooling, and kidsteading (homesteading with kids). We teach our kids about survival, self-sufficiency, gardening (vegetable, herb, flower), orchard, beekeeping, home keeping, soap making, harvesting, cooking, food preservation, livestock, nature, crafts, homesteading tools and wares, and more…

Welcome to my homestead…come and learn with us!

Comments

  1. Apple Sparck says:

    I didn’t know grape soda jelly was real until today. Eating breakfast with my husband and found out we didn’t have any grape jelly for my biscuits. Looked through the kitchen and had grape soda and thought, “If only I could make this into jelly.” That’s when I found this. Color me amazed. I’m going to try this out and share it with my family. They are going to love this. 😀

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